Ligonier Blog / Saturday / November 22 / 2014

Latest in Articles

  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 2)

    from John MacArthur May 05, 2009 Category: Articles

    The idea that God does what He wants, and that what He does is true and right because He does it, is foundational to our understanding of everything in Scripture, including the doctrine of election. Keep Reading
  • Divine Immutability and the Doctrines of Grace (pt. 1)

    from John MacArthur May 04, 2009 Category: Articles

    The Bible repeatedly and unapologetically underscores the fact that God does not change. In fact, He cannot change because He cannot improve on absolute perfection or decline in His eternally fixed nature. His person does not change: "'For I the Lord do not change'" (Mal. 3:6). His plans do not change: "The counsel of the Lord stands forever, the plans of his heart to all generations" (Ps. 33:11). His purpose does not change: "So when God desired to show more convincingly . . . the unchangeable character of his purpose, he guaranteed it with an oath" (Heb. 6:17). God does not change His mind: "'The Glory of Israel will not lie or have regret, for he is not a man, that he should have regret'" (1 Sam. 15:29); or His words: "The Holy One of Israel . . . does not call back his words" (Isa. 31:1-2); or His calling: "The gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable" (Rom. 11:29; cf. Heb. 13:8; James 1:17). There are absolutely no changes in God, no variations, and no surprises (cf. Ps. 102:27). Keep Reading
  • Serving Christ in a Time of Plague

    from Greg Bailey May 03, 2009 Category: Articles

    News reports in recent days have brought word of an outbreak of swine flu in Mexico and around the world, raising fears of a "pandemic." For those of us who live in the West, where health care and good nutrition are taken for granted, a plague is a thing virtually unknown. Of course, it was not so for our forefathers in the faith. How did they react in the face of mass outbreaks of disease? Keep Reading
  • Top 5 Commentaries on the Book of Zephaniah

    from Keith Mathison May 02, 2009 Category: Articles

    The book of the prophet Zephaniah indicates that he ministered during the reign of Josiah (640-609), the last of the godly kings of Judah (cf. Zeph. 1:1). There are a number of helpful commentaries on the Book of Zephaniah, and the following are five of the best. Keep Reading
  • Has Science Buried God?

    from Keith Mathison May 01, 2009 Category: Articles

    One of the most common ways of looking at the relationship between science and faith is the conflict thesis, which posits an inherent conflict between science and religion. The conflict thesis was popularized in the nineteenth century by John William Draper and by Andrew Dickson White. Despite the acknowledged poor scholarship underlying these works, the conflict thesis has persisted among both believers and unbelievers. Today, some scientists, including Peter Atkins, Daniel Dennett, and Richard Dawkins, are asserting that there should no longer be any conflict because science has shown us either that God does not exist or that God almost certainly does not exist. Keep Reading
  • The Christian and Art (pt. 3)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 30, 2009 Category: Articles

    Rembrandt used a fascinating technique whenever he painted his portraits, much like Michelangelo did when he created his sculptures. He used a technique later described by German philosophers (particularly Herder) as the "fruitful moment." (The German word for moment means "the blink of an eye.") Keep Reading
  • The Christian and Art (pt. 2)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 29, 2009 Category: Articles

    If we move from the realm of creation to the realm of biblical history, again we see dimensions of God's involvement in art. In the Old Testament, God ordained and commanded the building of the tabernacle and later of the temple. These were extravagant projects of art. By divine imperative, the children of Israel were commanded to bring their gold and silver, to melt them down, and to use them for adorning the vessels that would be a part of the holy place and of the holy of holies. The finest wood was brought from the distant mountains of Lebanon. They imported the perfect wood of the cedars to be used in the construction of the temple. Certain craftsmen, like Bezalel and Oholiab, were given charismatic gifts, special supernatural endowments by God, so that they could perform their artistic tasks of forming, shaping, and polishing the furniture and the utensils of the tabernacle (Exodus 31:6). God spent the energy of His Holy Spirit on an artistic enterprise. There was nothing "tacky" about the temple. It was a building whose excellence in every way called attention to the glory of the God whose house it was. Keep Reading
  • The Christian and Art (pt. 1)

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 28, 2009 Category: Articles

    I lived in the city of Amsterdam during the 1960s. As I walked through the city, I recognized the names on many of the street corners. There was Beethoven Straat, Vanderhelstlaan, and Rembrandt Plein. The streets and places that I encountered there often bore the name of famous composers or artists. Keep Reading
  • Another Doubter of Darwin Goes Public

    from Keith Mathison Apr 27, 2009 Category: Articles

    Although books related to the never-ending discussion of the pros and cons of Darwinism are constantly rolling off the presses, there are only a few that have the potential to mark a major turning point in the debate. Keep Reading
  • How Are We to Keep the Sabbath in Today’s Society?

    from R.C. Sproul Apr 26, 2009 Category: Articles

    Within the Christian church there are three leading options for answering your question. Some Christians believe that the Sabbath was an Old Testament ordinance and has no application to the New Testament church. No less a giant than Saint Augustine took the position that the Sabbath was not carried over into the New Testament community and therefore has been fulfilled and was done away with through the work of Christ. There are Christians who feel that there is no particular significance to Sabbath keeping today, although they make up a very small minority. Keep Reading

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