Ligonier Blog / Friday / April 25 / 2014

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  • A Man After God’s Own Heart

    from Karisa Schlehr Nov 20, 2008 Category: Articles

    Poet. Warrior. Musician. Shepherd. King. Theologian. Sinner. Few people can be accurately described using all of these adjectives, but we find one such person in the Old Testament -- David. Who was this man? At the utterance of his name, we inevitably think of his illicit relationship with Bathsheba. But is that all there was to his life? Keep Reading
  • Feed My Sheep: A Passionate Plea for Preaching

    from Deborah Finnamore Nov 20, 2008 Category: Articles

    In the Old Testament, God decried the fact that His people were perishing for lack of knowledge about Him. The same seems to be occurring today. There is "sharing," "suggesting," plenty of storytelling, and lots of preaching to "felt needs" in modern pulpits. But the authoritative, expositional opening of the Word of God is becoming scarcer all the time.   Jesus told Peter, "Feed my sheep" (John 21:17). Such is the mission for all Christ's shepherds. But when preaching is neglected, those who have been called to feed the sheep do little more than pet them. Here is encouragement for pastors to persevere in their calling and wisdom to guide congregations in holding their shepherds to the biblical standards. Keep Reading
  • John Calvin: A Heart for Devotion, Doctrine and Doxology

    from Deborah Finnamore Nov 19, 2008 Category: Ligonier Resources

    John Calvin is often reviled as a humorless doctrinarian who preached an austere theology that twisted Scripture. In John Calvin: A Heart for Devotion, Doctrine, and Doxology, Burk Parsons and a cadre of godly pastors and scholars seek to set the record straight in honor of the 500th observance of John Calvin's birth in 1509. Keep Reading
  • Top 5 Commentaries on the Book of Isaiah

    from Keith Mathison Nov 17, 2008 Category: Articles

    Of all the eighth century prophetic books, none matches the sheer scope of the book of Isaiah. His book covers the common prophetic themes of impending judgment and future restoration, but Isaiah also focuses much attention on the coming messianic King, the servant of God. There are a number of quite helpful commentaries on this prophetic book, and the following are five of the best. Keep Reading
  • Watch the 2008 Together for the Gospel conference online

    from Karisa Schlehr Nov 15, 2008 Category: Articles

    Last spring, 5,500 people attended the second bi-annual Together for the Gospel conference in Louisville, Kentucky. In case you missed it or just need to hear it again, these eight messages and six panel discussions will broadcast at Ligonier.org from Nov. 18-Dec. 5, 2008. Tell your friends and tune in this week. Keep Reading
  • Conquering the World

    from R.C. Sproul Jr. Nov 14, 2008 Category: Articles

    Thomas Aquinas was a great gift to the church. He stands among the greatest minds the world has ever known. This doesn't mean, of course, that he did not have his flaws, one of which goes to the heart of his intellectual labors. He saw it as his goal to synthesize the wisdom of Aristotle with the wisdom of the Bible. Now, Aristotle was no intellectual slouch either. That said, Thomas' goal ought to immediately raise flags for us. Even a dummy like me can see: why would anyone want to synthesize the Bible with anything? What does the Bible lack that Aristotle brought to the table? The Bible is sufficient to tell us that the Bible is sufficient. We don't need Aristotle -- or Aquinas -- to remind us that at the end of the day we don't need Aristotle or Aquinas. What we need is the Bible. Keep Reading
  • Spontaneous Compassion

    from Joni Eareckson Tada Nov 14, 2008 Category: Articles

    Bureaucracies aren't programmed to be compassionate. It's not in the nature of the thing. Take my friend, David Bowie, in his big, bulky wheelchair. After he became a quadriplegic in a car accident and his wife left him, he moved into a cramped one-room apartment and learned to rely on three or four part-time attendants to get him up and put him to bed. Life's not easy. Keep Reading
  • Bedtime Stories

    from Douglas Kelly Nov 13, 2008 Category: Articles

    As a father of five children, and now a grandfather, I have spent three and a half decades seeking to pass down the Christian faith to the next generation. Let me deal with only one area of this vast work -- one, I believe, that appears to have had some effectiveness in bringing up our little ones "in the nurture and admonition of the Lord," so that now as adults they all confess Christ. Keep Reading
  • Announcing Ligonier Academy

    from R. Fowler White Nov 12, 2008 Category: Articles

    When Ligonier Ministries first began, it was a place. A destination. A refuge for devoted learners and passionate followers of Christ. Ligonier quickly grew to become an organization with international scope, but its origin was as a place of study and fellowship centered on the teaching of Dr. R.C. Sproul. Ligonier Academy of Biblical & Theological Studies will once again provide a destination for study, fellowship, and collegial interaction essential to our goal to further equip Christians to know what they believe, why they believe it, how to live it, and how to share it. A long time ago, Dr. Sproul saw the need to offer an accessible, practical bridge of learning for the growing Christian, and Ligonier Ministries was born. Keep Reading
  • Ecclesiastical Myopia

    from R.C. Sproul Nov 11, 2008 Category: Articles

    Perhaps the most remarkable statement I ever heard a man utter from the pulpit was: "He has a penurious epistemology, which tends to be myopic." I was seated in the balcony of the church when that statement was made, and I could not restrain myself from laughing aloud. I nudged my wife Vesta and said, "I just might be the only person in the church who understood what that man said." What is a penurious epistemology? A penurious epistemology is a theory of knowledge that is poverty-stricken or on the verge of bankruptcy. Such a view of knowledge, if it tends towards myopia, is simply suffering a bad case of near-sightedness. I'm afraid that the American church suffers from a similar sort of myopia. Keep Reading

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